Also Make Sure You Check Out Our New Expat Shop!

A collection of how-to guides, travel tools, and courses to help expats move abroad.

New!

Share:
Notifications
Clear all

Philippines Tourist Visa- Requirements For Visa on Arrival, eVisa, and 9a Visa

(@marco-expat)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 592
Topic starter  
wpf-cross-image

Foreigners from the USA and 157 other countries can get a Philippines tourist visa on arrival. All other foreigners must apply for a 9a visa from the Philippines Consulate in their home country. Tourist visas can be extended in the Philippines. The maximum stay on a tourist visa is 24-36 months depending on citizenship.

This topic was modified 2 months ago 2 times by Marco

   
Quote
 Moe
(@Moe)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 1
 

How to apply for 9A tourist visa for Syrian National?


   
ReplyQuote
(@marco-expat)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 592
Topic starter  

Hi Moe,

I'm afraid there isn't great news for citizens from visa-restricted countries (like Syria) when it comes to 9a tourist visas.

Foreigners from Visa-Required Countries NOT on the EO 408 list are ineligible for Philippines Visa On Arrival. Instead, these citizens must get an Entry Exception Document (EED) from the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA), then apply for a 9a Temporary Visitors Visa with their EED at the Philippines Embassy or Consulate in their jurisdiction before traveling to the Philippines.

To get an EED for tourism, you can follow the instructions here

https://nomadicfire.com/travel-to-the-philippines-right-now#eed

Let me know if you have any questions.

Cheers,

Marco


   
ReplyQuote
(@Diane)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 1
 

As a Canadian national can I apply for the 9a visa (29 days) during the 30 days of tourist visa on arrival in the Philippines. Have seen sites where instructed to use OVAS before arriving. I will be applying for SRRV. Need assurance of the proper procedure for a 9a visa.


   
ReplyQuote
(@marco-expat)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 592
Topic starter  

Hi Diana, you have two options. Both options work to get the SRRV:

  1. Get a 9a in Canada- The 9a allows you 59 days in the country (extendable if needed)
  2. Arrive in the Philippines Visa-Free Canada is one of the countries that doesn't need a visa to enter the Philippines. You can get a Visa On Arrival valid for 30-days, then you can apply for a visa waiver for 29 days for a total of 59 days (extendable if needed)
  3. Both options work, the question is if it is easier to go to the Philippine Embassy or Consulate in Canada to file the 9a or come in Visa on Arrival and go to the Philippines Bureau of Immigration office for a 29-day visa waiver.

    Your other option is to come to the Philippines Visa on Arrival, then have one of my Visa Specialists handle your visa waiver for you and save you the hassle of dealing with the immigration office and waiting in line.

    If you would like help with your 9a or your SRRV, you can sign up for a one-on-one consultation. If you decide to use our service, the consultation is free.

    https://nomadicfire.com/philippines-visa-consultation

    Let me know if we can help.

    Cheers,

    Marco


   
ReplyQuote
(@Michael)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 2
 

Hello, I'm 55 years old and wanting to move to Cebu City in October, 2022. I won't have the $20k to put in a bank account for 2 more years. What are the best options, visa wise, for me.

Thanks,
Michael


   
ReplyQuote
(@marco-expat)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 592
Topic starter  

Hi Mike,

What is your citizenship? What passport you hold will dictate what options you have for long-term visas in the Philippines.


   
ReplyQuote
(@bill sander)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 2
 

What is the deposit required for the SRRV visa. Problem is I really need an extended visa to see if I wish to retire in the Philippines. I am retired and have a pension which will well qualify me for the expat citizen requirements. It appears your phone number is Portland, Oregon and I will call tomorrow. A sizeable deposit would be a disappointment if I decided that the Philippines was not a fit for my lifestyle. Please contact me at your earliest convenience. Thank you.


   
ReplyQuote
(@marco-expat)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 592
Topic starter  

Hi Bill,

Thanks for reaching out. The SRRV deposit is between $20000 to $50000 unless you are former military or worked at a Philippine-based NGO.
https://nomadicfire.com/philippines-retirement-visa#requirements
Note that the amount is a deposit, not a fee. The deposit is returned to you if you decide to leave the Philippines. In exchange for the deposit, you are allowed long-term residency in the Philippines without the need for visa runs. An additional benefit is a deposit doesn't need to sit in a bank, you can invest the deposit in a condominium purchase or long-term lease of a house and lot.

Given Vietnam doesn't offer a retirement visa and Thailand's visa has a $20,000+ non-refundable FEE, you can argue the Philippines has one of the most accessible retirement visa policies in SE Asia.

Additionally, you mention you are looking for a long-term visa to determine if the Philippines "fits your lifestyle." You don't need the SRRV to stay long-term. You can live in the Philippines with continual tourist visa extensions for up to 3 years (depending on your citizenship).

https://nomadicfire.com/philippines-tourist-visa#visa-on-arrival-extension

However, the SRRV is a cheaper and more hassle-free way to stay long-term. If you have any additional questions or need help determining which visa is best for you, we offer a one-hour visa consultation.

https://nomadicfire.com/philippines-visa-consultation

Cheers,

Marco


   
ReplyQuote
 Ali
(@Ali)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 2
 

Hi Marco

I have applied for 9a tourist visa through Philippine embassy in Ireland
And as Holders of Irish Travel Documents (Convention of 28 July 1951) issued by Ireland.
The Embassy informed me that Visa application it’s require clearance from the Department of Foreign Affairs before the Embassy is allowed to process and issue a corresponding visa. ( EED )
and they submitted the request already but they mentioned that it could takes a month or even more before they receive it from the DFA.

And the question if there is a way to speed the process from the DFA Manila and can you assist with this matter ?

Thank you


   
ReplyQuote
(@marco-expat)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 592
Topic starter  

Hi Ali,

Due to the frequently changing rules, sometimes Embassies are not up-to-date on the latest. As of April 1, 2022, any foreigners entering the Philippines no longer require an Entry Exemption Document (EED).


   
ReplyQuote
 ALI
(@ALI)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 2
 

Hi Marco

Thank you for your reply but here it might roles are different cz I’m holding a travel documents ( not ordinary passport) ?
even though in DFA and ( ovs)website they seems considering the travel documents issued by non visa required countries have the same role as the normal passports
but yet I can’t argue with the embassy and im just following their instructions )
Thanks again


   
ReplyQuote
(@marco-expat)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 592
Topic starter  

Yup. Arguing with government bureaucrats is generally an exercise in futility. However, there are two parts to what the Embassy is telling you that are completely contradictory to what the Bureau of Immigration states.

1) It's very clear that EEDs are no longer required.

Philippines Bureau of Immigration Philippines Entry Requirements as of April 1, 2022

2) EEDs are a government agency to government agency request. You don't request for an EED directly. The EED is requested by a Philippine government agency to the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) on your behalf. Getting an EED requires finding a Philippine government agency with jurisdiction of your reason to enter the Philippines.

The requesting government agency you need to contact depends on your reason to enter the Philippines. For Example:

Retirement (SRRV) = Philippine Retirement Authority
Marriage Visa = No need for EED request a 9a directly from the Philippine Embassy or Consulate of your country of residence
Working Visa = Department of Labor and Employment
Student Visa (Primary up to Secondary Level) = Department of Education

https://nomadicfire.com/philippines-entry-exemption-document

I would consider showing them the documentation from the BOI about the EED and get their feedback. Good luck.

Cheers,

Marco


   
ReplyQuote
(@Michael)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 2
 

Thank you for the reply. I'm a US citizen.


   
ReplyQuote
(@marco-expat)
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 592
Topic starter  

Michael,

If you don't want to make a deposit, as a US Citizen, you can still enter the Philippines Visa-Free. Once you are here, you can extend a tourist visa for up to 3 years. It gets pricy that way, as each extension costs money and a tourist visa doesn't give you permanent residency nor the benefits of an SRRV retirement visa. If you have a Filipino spouse, you have also have the 13a Marriage Visa as an option. You can read more about each visa below:

To understand how the SRRV visa works, click here.
To learn more about the 13a Marriage Visa click here.

If you need a personalized visa recommendation, feel free to reach out.

https://nomadicfire.com/philippines-visa-consultation

Cheers,

Marco


   
ReplyQuote
Page 1 / 3
>